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Medical Xpress Ophthalmology News Feed

  • Study finds novel mechanism that may confer protection against glaucomaStudy finds novel mechanism that may confer protection against glaucoma
    A team of researchers from LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence and the University of Copenhagen provides the first evidence that patients with ocular hypertension may exhibit superior antioxidant protection that promotes resistance to the elevated intraocular pressure associated with glaucoma. Their findings are published online in the Journal of Clinical Medicine, available here. Read more »
  • Do ordinary eyeglasses offer protection against COVID-19?Do ordinary eyeglasses offer protection against COVID-19?
    (HealthDay)—Eyeglasses keep you from tripping over footstools and walking into walls, but they also might have a side benefit to spark envy among those with 20/20 vision. Read more »
  • Pet laser pointers have enough power to 'blast away' cells in the back of the eyePet laser pointers have enough power to 'blast away' cells in the back of the eye
    Laser pointers used to exercise pets may seem like safe and simple low-powered devices, but an Ohio teen learned the hard way that staring at the narrow beam can cause permanent eye damage. Read more »
  • Opening eyes to a frontier in vision restorationOpening eyes to a frontier in vision restoration
    A revolutionary cortical vision device, developed by Monash University researchers that could one day help restore vision to the blind, is being prepared for world-first human clinical trials in Melbourne. Read more »
  • Study first to show non-harmful stress protects against disease in offspringStudy first to show non-harmful stress protects against disease in offspring
    Research led by Jeff Gidday, Ph.D., Professor of Ophthalmology, Biochemistry, Neuroscience, and Physiology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, reports what is believed to be the first study in a mammalian model documenting the reprogramming of heritability to promote disease resilience in the next generation. The results are published in the Journal of Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, the flagship journal of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO). Read more »
  • Levodopa may improve vision in patients with macular degenerationLevodopa may improve vision in patients with macular degeneration
    Investigators have determined that treating patients with an advanced form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with levodopa, a safe and readily available drug commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease, stabilized and improved their vision. It reduced the number of treatments necessary to maintain vision, and as such, will potentially reduce the burden of treating the disease, financially and otherwise. Their findings appear in the American Journal of Medicine, published by Elsevier. Read more »
  • Researchers visualize the retina's function at the cellular levelResearchers visualize the retina's function at the cellular level
    While there is no cure for blindness and macular degeneration, scientists have accelerated the process to find a cure by visualizing the inner workings of the eye and its diseases at the cellular level. Read more »
  • Researchers stride toward a therapeutic testbed for age-related macular degenerationResearchers stride toward a therapeutic testbed for age-related macular degeneration
    As we get older, many of our body's processes start slowing down. For instance, a cut on the hand will take longer to heal after middle age than in youth. That said, it still heals. Read more »
  • Gene therapy for inherited blindnessGene therapy for inherited blindness
    Retinitis pigmentosa is the most prevalent form of congenital blindness. Using a retinitis pigmentosa mouse model, LMU researchers have now shown that targeted activation of genes of similar function can compensate for the primary defect. Read more »
  • A healthy lifestyle for cardiovascular health also promotes good eye healthA healthy lifestyle for cardiovascular health also promotes good eye health
    In a new study, investigators found that ideal cardiovascular health, which is indicative of a healthy lifestyle, was associated with lower odds for ocular diseases especially diabetic retinopathy. These findings appearing in the American Journal of Medicine, published by Elsevier, suggest that interventions to prevent cardiovascular diseases may also hold promise in preventing ocular diseases. Read more »
  • Researchers develop cell injection technique that could help reverse vision lossResearchers develop cell injection technique that could help reverse vision loss
    University of Toronto Engineering researchers have developed a new method of injecting healthy cells into damaged eyes. The technique could point the way toward new treatments with the potential to reverse forms of vision loss that are currently incurable. Read more »
  • Artificial intelligence recognizes deteriorating photoreceptorsArtificial intelligence recognizes deteriorating photoreceptors
    Software based on artificial intelligence (AI), which was developed by researchers at the Eye Clinic of the University Hospital Bonn, Stanford University and University of Utah, enables the precise assessment of the progression of geographic atrophy (GA), a disease of the light sensitive retina caused by age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This innovative approach permits the fully automated measurement of the main atrophic lesions using data from optical coherence tomography, which provides three-dimensional visualization of the structure of the retina. In… Read more »
  • Nanotubes in the eye that help us seeNanotubes in the eye that help us see
    A new mechanism of blood redistribution that is essential for the proper functioning of the adult retina has just been discovered in vivo by researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM). Read more »
  • Multifocal contact lenses slow myopia progression in childrenMultifocal contact lenses slow myopia progression in children
    Children wearing multifocal contact lenses had slower progression of their myopia, according to results from a clinical trial funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health. The findings support an option for controlling the condition, also called nearsightedness, which increases the risk of cataracts, glaucoma and retinal detachment later in life. Investigators of the Bifocal Lenses In Nearsighted Kids (BLINK) Study published the results August 11 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Read more »
  • New treatment targets found for blinding retinal diseaseNew treatment targets found for blinding retinal disease
    When the eye isn't getting enough oxygen in the face of common conditions like premature birth or diabetes, it sets in motion a state of frenzied energy production that can ultimately result in blindness, and now scientists have identified new points where they may be able to calm the frenzy and instead enable recovery. Read more »
  • Researchers discover predictor of laser treatment success in patients with glaucomaResearchers discover predictor of laser treatment success in patients with glaucoma
    More than 70 million people worldwide suffer from glaucoma, a condition that causes a build-up of fluid and pressure inside the eye and can eventually lead to blindness. Treatment options have traditionally included eye drops to reduce the fluid the eye produces or surgery to unclog the eye's drainage. But a new study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care provides insight into which patients might benefit most from a noninvasive treatment called selective laser… Read more »
  • Researchers devise approach to treat rare, incurable form of blindnessResearchers devise approach to treat rare, incurable form of blindness
    Best vitelliform macular degeneration, or Best disease, is an inherited eye condition that typically leads to blindness over the course of a few decades. The disease can be caused by more than two hundred mutations in the BEST1 gene. Read more »
  • Researchers discover stem cells in the optic nerve that enable preservation of visionResearchers discover stem cells in the optic nerve that enable preservation of vision
    Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have for the first time identified stem cells in the region of the optic nerve, which transmits signals from the eye to the brain. The finding, published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), presents a new theory on why the most common form of glaucoma may develop and provides potential new ways to treat a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Read more »
  • Study points to potential new approach to treating glaucoma and Alzheimer's diseaseStudy points to potential new approach to treating glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease
    Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have shown for the first time that when one optic nerve in the eye is damaged, as in glaucoma, the opposite optic nerve comes to the rescue by sharing its metabolic energy. Read more »
  • Physician-scientists pioneer new surgical approach to treat progressive blindnessPhysician-scientists pioneer new surgical approach to treat progressive blindness
    Dry age-related macular degeneration (dry AMD) poses a significant clinical challenge. It is one of the leading causes of progressive blindness, robbing millions of people over the age of 65 of their central vision, and it often hinders patients' abilities to read books, drive and discern the faces of their loved ones. Although vitamin-based supplements may slow progression, no treatments currently exist. Read more »
  • Scientists identify a new drug target for dry age-related macular degenerationScientists identify a new drug target for dry age-related macular degeneration
    Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that the blood protein vitronectin is a promising drug target for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision loss in Americans 60 years of age and older. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), also holds implications for Alzheimer's and heart disease, which are linked to vitronectin. Read more »
  • Vision scientists discover why humans literally don't see eye to eyeVision scientists discover why humans literally don't see eye to eye
    We humans may not always see eye to eye on politics, religion, sports and other matters of debate. But at least we can agree on the location and size of objects in our physical surroundings. Or can we? Read more »
  • Researchers uncover a critical early step of the visual processResearchers uncover a critical early step of the visual process
    The key components of electrical connections between light receptors in the eye and the impact of these connections on the early steps of visual signal processing have been identified for the first time, according to research published today in Science Advances by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Read more »
  • A revolutionary new treatment alternative to corneal transplantationA revolutionary new treatment alternative to corneal transplantation
    The team was co-led by May Griffith, a researcher at Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre, which is affiliated with Université de Montréal and is part of the CIUSSS de l'Est-de-l'Île-de-Montréal. Read more »
  • New eye drops may prevent a common cause of blindnessNew eye drops may prevent a common cause of blindness
    Researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center have developed eye drops that could prevent vision loss after retinal vein occlusion, a major cause of blindness for millions of adults worldwide. Read more »
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